Consumer-Driven Contract Tests

The most useful way I’ve seen such contract tests work is that the team that consumes the messages creates and publishes an artifact in their build pipeline for use by the creators of the messages. For this example let’s have it create a tarball with a shell script entry point. The inputs to the shell script can be a URL to the api-server and any other parameters required, like user IDs, oauth tokens, etc....

Building Clouds

I’ve spent this year building networks using Amazon Web Servicesand teaching people how to do it. So I’d like to share the code that I’ve used as teaching examples and as seeds for the creation of some pretty cool environments. AWS PY was my first published attempt at interacting with AWS in python & Puppet to instantiate, provision and control EC2 instances, as well as the seed for an incredibly cool project at the start of this year....

Provision EC2 instance using boto

Sam Newman recently published a very interesting blog entry on using fabric to apply puppet scripts on remote machines. He left the provision_using_boto() method as an exercise to the reader. That just sounded tempting enough to be a challenge since I hadn't gotten around to looking at boto. You can find the result of my attempt on GitHub. To be precise aws.py implements the provisioning using boto and fabfile.py drives fabric and puppet....

RPMs and Effing Package Management

I've been using FPM to build native packages for applications for the last few months and so far I cannot believe just how cool it is. It can create RPMs and DEBs from ruby gems, python modules, node packages and even directories. The last one is very useful for packaging up stand-alone java apps. Check it out, you may like it too....

AWS CloudFront invalidation

It is now possible to invalidate objects (files) in AWS CloudFront distributions. Handy when someone, like me, occasionally publishes files with the wrong content type. Here is how I implement this invalidation in python....

JRuby rake and maven

I cannot stand Maven. It makes me nauseous. However that does not seem to be the case for other institutionalised developers. Here’s what I did on a project where I wanted to isolate its craziness and still use jruby and rake. namespace :maven do M2_HOME = "binaries/apache-maven-3.0.3" desc "Run the maven package goal" task :package => :clean do mvn "package" end desc "Run the application" task :application => :clean do mvn "test-compile", "exec:java", "-Dexec....

RubyGems in a JAR

On a few projects now I’ve used jruby with rake. I know that I can use rvm and just fetch the gems per project, but for developers stuck on windows that way is a little more than difficult. So here’s how I package up rubygems in a JAR. mkdir gemjar java -jar jruby-complete-1.6.3.jar -S gem install -i ./gemjar haml --version 3.1.2 --no-rdoc --no-ri java -jar jruby-complete-1.6.3.jar -S gem install -i ....

JRuby Rake and Ivy

Here’s a neat way of using ivy with jruby, rake & ant. task :ivy_retrieve do ant.taskdef :resource => "org/apache/ivy/ant/antlib.xml" do classpath :location => "ivy/ivy-2.2.0.jar" end ant.configure :file => "ivy/ivysettings.xml" ant.resolve :file => "ivy/ivy.xml" ant.retrieve :pattern => "lib/[conf]/[type]/[artifact]-[revision].[ext]", :sync => "true" puts end Still using ant, still angle bracket free (except for ivy, sigh). Read my previous post if you want to know more about jruby, rake and ant....

Zero-downtime deployments

For some time now I’ve been thinking about all the different approaches that I have seen and heard with the goal of zero-downtime deployment for a horizontally-scaled application that relies on a database or some form of persistent storage. On most of the projects that I have worked on this was not a requirement, although a speedy and automated deployment was preferred. However, other projects were for websites and applications that formed the backbone of a 24/7 company and as such the idea of even a couple of minutes downtime was unacceptable....

JRuby Rake Vs Ant

For the longest time I’ve been writing Java build files in XML and I’ve always felt a little dirty. Not too long ago I was re-introduced to rake by a colleague (thanks Fabio) and how nicely it integrates with ant. This means that you can now turn this: <project name="spring-conversations" default="build" basedir="."> <property name="src.dir" location="src/main" /> <property name="test.dir" location="src/test" /> <property name="build.dir" location="build" /> <property name="dist.dir" location="${build.dir}/dist" /> <property name="report.dir" location="${build....